The shift to a mobile marketplace is well underway, and more companies are adopting the mindset that mobile should be the first thought rather than an afterthought. While this type of disruptive change often brings about exciting periods of innovation and experimentation – and at the very least, many learning opportunities – identifying and leveraging a successful mobile strategy model is critical for an organization’s long-term success.
Mobile strategy

Diagnosing an Effective Mobile Strategy

How can companies relatively new to mobile or venturing into the space assess the effectiveness of their mobile strategy? Does your company even have a mobile strategy? Some companies believe they do, when they actually have a collection of tactics or activities they’ve mistaken for a mobile strategy.

An excellent starting point for assessing your company’s position is Phil Buckellew’s recent article, ‘Five signs your company could have an even more effective mobile strategy’ summarized below:

Five Indicators of An Effective Mobile Strategy

  • The strategy is company-wide in focus.
    A good mobile strategy incorporates every department and gives every employee a role. If your strategy is heavily focused on some departments or excludes others, you likely have a tactical plan, rather than a comprehensive one.
  • The strategy is evolving – by design.
    The mobile landscape continues to change, so a sound strategy should work over the long-term. Refreshing the strategy periodically based on new data is smart and necessary. If a complete overhaul is required annually just to stay current then you do not have a strategy.
  • The strategy is based on business process.
    A common issue for companies adopting a mobile strategy is a design centered on the technology or even a set of apps instead of the business process itself. Technology has changed and will continue to change, but focusing on delivering value through business process optimization is a ‘true north’ approach for long-term success.
  • The strategy is user experience-based.
    Effective mobile strategies keep the end user experience top of mind throughout the entire process. Not only should this include technological changes already mentioned (wearable technology and virtual reality are just two examples), but even in the early stages of design – solving the customer’s problem in a simple and pragmatic matter.
    The strategy is led from the top.
  • A mobile strategy is dependent upon sponsorship.
    Effective mobile strategies touch the entire corporation (see indicator number 1), and therefore need high-level, executive sponsorship to ensure proper funding and prioritization among other initiatives, as well as execution to deliver results.

Is your business ready to devise a powerful mobile strategy? SevenTablets can help you analyze current business practices to find opportunities for mobile integration, cost savings and increased revenue generation.

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Adam Rizzieri

Adam Rizzieri

Director at SevenTablets
Adam Rizzieri has worked to build a marketing organization that has yielded a revenue growth of over 300% relative to the past three years of business combined.

Adam cultivated the creation of an industry leading $300M affiliate program and also worked as a marketing consultant on the start-up team of a now publicly traded commercial energy brokerage firm. He was one of the first media buyers on Facebook, and also among the first to work in the SAG-AFTRA New Media (WebTV) industry, serving the online commercial and content needs of major Hollywood studios.

Adam holds a BA from Southern Methodist University and a MS in International Marketing Management from Boston University.
Adam Rizzieri